Aging and Medication: Hazards, Health, and Hope

Every new drug formulation, testing phase, and government approval means longer, healthier lives. However, new medicines also bring new problems and the possibility of exacerbating old ones. Aging and medication go hand in hand, but how much do you really know about your prescriptions?

Senior Woman Taking Medication From Pill Box. Aging and medication concept

Aging and Medication: Fast Facts

  • Adults age 65 and older buy 30% of all prescription drugs and 40% of all OTC medications.
  • One in six seniors will suffer an adverse reaction to their medications.
  • Falls are the leading cause of death among the elderly, and many of those falls are related to a drug overdose, missed doses, and adverse drug interactions.
  • Prescription drug abuse is found in about 30% of those between the ages of 65 and 85.
  • Polypharmacy, “defined as the use of multiple drugs or more than are medically necessary, is a growing concern for older adults” and increases the chance of death in the elderly.

90% of the aging population faces a higher risk of Alzheimer’s, dementia, stroke, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and diabetes. However bad the statistics, adding new drugs without careful consideration increases both the chances of bad reactions and abuse.

What do you need to know about aging and medication?

Learning to Ask Questions

The best way to ensure that you or your loved one are getting the right treatments is to ask questions. Educate yourself! Do you know the possible side effects of your heart medication? Do you understand why you should always take a certain pill on an empty stomach? Are your prescriptions compatible? These questions can help you avoid hazards and enjoy the benefits of your medications.

Not sure how to approach your doctor with these questions? Consider a three-way conversation between the patient, the doctor, and a health advocate. The advocate is a friend, relative or healthcare professional who serves as a listener, note-taker (see our blog post “Don’t Worry: I’ll Take Notes For You“), and information seeker. Together, go over which doctors are prescribing which drugs as well as the dosages, side effects, and things to avoid. You should also discuss OTC products such as vitamins and herbal supplements. Additionally, review the patient’s daily routine and health, as well as any physical or cognitive changes.

Drug Interactions: What to Know

Medications interact with other medications and alcohol as well as certain foods. These interactions cause prescriptions to work differently or stop working altogether. Age also changes how drugs work; the aging body has less muscle to absorb medication, so dosage adjustments are sometimes necessary to prevent side effects. Ask your doctor to cover drug interactions for each new prescription you receive.

Missed Doses

Depending on the type of medication and the person’s condition, missed doses of certain medications can result in rapid and serious illness. Time-released drugs, drugs requiring food, and drugs for diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure, seizure disorders and cancer treatments are critical. Trying to make up a missed dose by doubling it can result in a trip to the emergency room.

There are smartphone reminder apps, charts and calendar reminders available, and for the forgetful, there are smart pill bottles.

 

Our agency’s 33 years of experienced care is reflected in every nurse and administrator on our team. For more information about David York Agency’s qualified, compassionate caregivers, please contact us at 718.376.7755. If you’d like to hear more from us, please like us on Facebook or follow us on TwitterGoogle+, or LinkedIn.

Acupuncture for Seniors

When you think of acupuncture, what should come to mind is skinny needles inserted into parts of the body. It seemingly mysteriously relieves pain, lose weight, and quit smoking. Acupuncture for seniors has many benefits. It is worth investigating how it might benefit yourself or a loved one you may be caring for. Over 20 million people have tried acupuncture and that number is growing as the Baby Boomers age out and look into new modes of treatment ignored by the previous generation.

Acupuncture works with the meridian system.

According to the Mayo Clinic,”Traditional Chinese medicine explains acupuncture as a technique for balancing the flow of energy or life force — known as chi or qi (chee) — believed to flow through pathways (meridians) in your body.” It is an ancient form of healing that dates back to 100 B.C.E. Its exact mechanism is not clear whether it is biochemical or through neuropaths. The acupuncturist manipulates certain parts of the outer body in order to control the internal organs. In this Chinese practice, there are 12 standard meridians in the arms and legs. For example, some meridians in the arm affect the heart, lungs, and small intestine when manipulated. In addition, some meridians in the legs affect the kidneys, stomach, and gall bladder. The use of sterilized needles send signals throughout these regions.

Skilled acupuncturists will inflict no pain at all.

Many get squeamish when thinking about the needles. The common belief is that needles come with intense amounts of pain. However, that is not the case. The skilled acupuncturist not only inserts the needles, but manipulates them to create tingling sensations. Once achieved, with the energy flow unrestricted, further healing commences to the ailing organs.

Acupuncture will potentially restore the body to a youthful, harmonious state.

For the elderly and for caregivers alike, acupuncture is especially beneficial to alleviate symptoms of depression and anxiety. It’s also known to benefit elderly patients suffering from ailments which stem from over-medication. Western medication is potentially taxing to a senior citizen’s body. Also, mainstream doctors are increasing turning to acupuncture to alleviate the symptoms of chemotherapy. There is also research on its benefits for sleep disturbances, gastrointestinal diseases and drug addiction.

Check it out with your geriatrician.

As with everything, you must consult your physician before starting any treatment. Those who have pacemakers must clear this treatment with their doctors if mild electrical impulses are being used. These can interfere with the pacemaker’s operation. Similarly, those with a blood disorder or blood thinners must be careful of any bruising that may result from the use of needles.

 

For more information about David York Agency’s qualified, compassionate caregivers, contact us at 718.376.7755. A free phone consultation can help you decide what services might be best to provide you and your loved one with the assistance they need. If you’d like to hear more from us, please like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter, Google+, or LinkedIn.

Yoga for Seniors: No Mat, No Problem

Yoga is wonderful option for the aging senior. The best thing about yoga is that you can practice anytime or anywhere. You don’t need a mat to practice yoga just a few minutes a day. Think about yoga as a state of mind, a way of creating an inner peace with yourself and the world. If you go in with this mindset, you will take a lot away from your practice. This AARP article and video can help get you started with some basic poses if you are a beginner. However if you find yourself without a mat, you can practice these techniques.

 

Mindful Meditation. 

Meditation is the art of clearing your mind to create a greater awareness and appreciation of the world around you. Practicing mindful meditation as a senior can help you center your thoughts and create an inner calm.

Focus on Your Breathing.  

Pranayama, also known as yoga breathing, is the practice of breaking down your breath to help you relax. This form of yoga can help you lower your heart rate, get more oxygen to your brain as well as help your muscles relax. Just a few minutes a day of this technique can help you renew your energy for the day.

Practice Your Standing Poses. 

Standing poses allow you to work on your balance, strength and flexibility. Incorporate a few forward folds, standing back bends and side bends to help you keep your muscles pliable. These poses will also help reinvigorate you.

The most wonderful thing about yoga is that it is your practice. Make it what you want, take from it what you need. It is a great activity for active seniors and newcomers to exercise. Contact us for more information.

For more information about David York Agency’s qualified, compassionate caregivers, contact us at 718.376.7755. A free phone consultation can help you decide what services might be best to provide you and your loved one with the assistance they need. If you’d like to hear more from us, please like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter, Google+, or LinkedIn.

 

Senior Care: Low Impact Water Exercises

Importance of Regular Exercise:

Doctors often recommend strength training to seniors to keep muscles and joints functioning at their best ability. According to The American Academy of Family Physicians “Regular exercise provides a myriad of health benefits in older adults, including improvements in blood pressure, diabetes, lipid profile, osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, and neurocognitive function”.  Unfortunately, for many seniors, aching joints and arthritis often act to discourage making healthy exercise part of a daily routine.

Water Aerobics:

Water aerobics can be the solution to this problem. It provides a fun, low impact exercise regime to help seniors stay active. Although the best choice would be to find a certified water aerobics instructor, there are several water exercises that one can do without the help of a trainer.

Water walking:

Water walking is the perfect low-impact exercise to get the heart pumping. It can be as easy as walking through the water from one side of the pool to the other. The water acts as resistance to help build muscle mass. If walking across the pool proves to be too much, marching in place can also be quite effective. To add difficulty to this exercise one can add hand weights or the speed of walking.

Simple Leg-lifts:

This one also uses the resistance of the water to work the muscles in the legs without much joint impact. Stand in the shallow end of the pool and grasp the wall. Lift one leg out to the side as far as is comfortable and then place it back down. Repeat until your leg begins to tire, then switch legs.

Arm Curls:

Starting with your hands at your sides, bend at the elbow and lift hands toward face with palms facing up. The water will work as resistance in this exercise as well but the addition of hand or water weights will increase the results.

Although water aerobics limit joint impact it is always best to speak with a medical professional before making any fitness or lifestyle changes. Also, it is not wise to work our or swim alone, its more fun to try water aerobics with a friend anyway!

 

Aside from regular exercise, as your loved one ages they may need more comprehensive care. For more information about David York Agency’s qualified, compassionate caregivers, contact us at 718.376.7755.

Contact us today for more information about meeting the health and care needs of your aging loved one. A free phone consultation can help you decide what services might be best to provide you and your loved one with the assistance they need. If you’d like to hear more from us, please like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter, Google+, or LinkedIn.

Ageism and Dental Care

Senior woman at the dentist. Ageism and dental care concept

For many Americans age 65 and older, dental care is a necessity that they cannot afford. Some older adults live on Social Security benefits of just $850 per month. Unfortunately, the cost of dental insurance and associated copays are just too expensive with this limiting budget. Additionally, the link between ageism and dental care means the care seniors receive is less than what they require.

As a result, seniors live with cavities, cracked or damaged teeth, and periodontal disease. Some seniors will turn to the emergency room for help while others may rely on over-the-counter remedies, or perform their own tooth extractions.

 

Dental Issues That Affect Older Adults

Oral health concerns that are common in people age 65 and older include:

  • Dry Mouth Syndrome is common in older adults. Caused by over 400 medications, severe dry mouth can contribute to cavities, mouth sores, infection, and difficulty swallowing.
  • Periodontal disease causes the gums to become red and swollen. Over time, the gums may separate from the teeth, and bone, tissue and tooth loss may occur. The inflammatory processes associated with long-term periodontal disease have been linked to dementia.

 

Ageism and Dental Care

Ageism is a term that refers to stereotypes assigned to older adults. Typically, ageism results in unequal access to medical prevention, detection, and treatment. For example, seniors receive fewer screenings for colorectal cancer, skin cancer, and osteoporosis than younger people. Even taking into account balancing the stress of the procedure on an older person, there is still a disproportionate imbalance in care. This is also troubling because the senior population is at greater risk for these diseases.

Although concern about age discrimination in healthcare usually focuses on medicine, disparities also occur in dentistry:

  • Ageist beliefs are a major factor in the inadequate provision of dental care for long-term care residents. Studies found that nursing home administrators believed that dentists were reluctant to see older residents, while the dentists felt the staff did not reach out for dental consultation often enough.
  • A survey of over 300 dental students found that a significant number believed older adults are less vital, less adaptable, and less likely to actively pursue goals than younger patients.
  • There are not enough geriatric-informed treatment standards. There is also call for better education among dental providers, caregivers, families, and patients.

 

Challenging Ageist Ideas

Research shows that when dental hygienist students and dental students have an opportunity to work directly with seniors, negative stereotypes towards this group are reduced.

 

Finding Affordable Care

Several resources are available to seniors who struggle to pay for dental care. Some dental hygienists can see older adults in their homes or at care facilities. This ensures cost-effective preventative care.

 

 Providing Compassionate Care

  • Address dry mouth by encouraging the use of over-the-counter rinses, pastes, sprays, and lozenges. All of these simple remedies will help lubricate the mouth.
  • Caregivers must ensure their own safety when assisting agitated clients with oral hygiene. For some patients with dementia, small brushes or oral foam swabs may work best.
  • Give dental hygiene its due focus. Devote at least 2 minutes to brushing teeth each day.

 

Dental health is of utmost importance to seniors. The rising tide of ageism makes it difficult to ensure all seniors are receiving proper care, but David York can help!

For more information about David York Agency’s qualified, compassionate caregivers, please contact us at 718.376.7755. If you’d like to hear more from us, please like us on Facebook or follow us on TwitterGoogle+, or LinkedIn.

Loss of Vision and Hearing May Cause Cognitive Decline in Seniors

It’s not uncommon for seniors to experience hearing and vision loss. Sadly, these changes can cause both physical and emotional hardships. They may feel a loss of independence, an inability to do the things they love, and a disconnect from the world around them. Beyond these discomforts, with the loss of vision and hearing, they may experience cognitive decline.

Read on to learn more about how hearing and vision loss causes dementia and cognitive decline in seniors.

Senior woman inserts hearing aid in her ear learning about Cognitive Decline in Seniors from nurse

Vision Loss and Cognitive Decline in Seniors

The most recent study on the relationship between vision loss and cognitive decline looked at two datasets. This data covered 16 years and included more than 33,000 people aged 60 and up. Published in JAMA Ophthalmology in September 2017, it concluded that “vision dysfunction…was associated with poor cognitive function.”

This confirms a study conducted at the University of Michigan in 2010. This six-year study followed 625 elderly participants and had similar findings. These findings were published in the American Journal of Epidemiology, and concluded that “untreated poor vision is associated with cognitive decline, particularly Alzheimer’s disease.”

Hearing Loss and Cognitive Decline

Hearing loss also plays a part in cognitive decline in seniors. The reason for this is unclear, but there is speculation that  uncorrected deficits in vision and hearing may accelerate this.

The New York Times recently interviewed Dr. Suzann Pershing – lead author of the study and an ophthalmologist at Stanford University School of Medicine – to learn more. Pershing said that “this association doesn’t prove vision loss causes cognitive decline. Intuitively, it makes sense that the less engaged people are with the world, the less cognitive stimulation they receive, and the more likely their cognitive function will decline.”

A study published in JAMA Internal Medicine in 2013 observed 1,984 adults with an average age of 77. The study confirms that “hearing loss is associated with accelerated cognitive decline and incident cognitive impairment.” Also noteworthy, Adults with hearing loss will experience cognitive decline 30-40% faster than those with normal hearing.

A Causal Relationship?

According to Dr. Frank R. Lin, otolaryngologist at the Johns Hopkins Center on Aging and Health, said, “Older adults with hearing loss face an increased risk of dementia even when you control for diseases like diabetes and high blood pressure. So we think they’re causally related.”

There are a few reasons this may happen:

  • hearing-impaired people tend to become isolated and lack stimulation
  • hearing loss causes brain atrophy that affects memory and thinking
  • the brain has to work harder to understand muffled or distorted speech

But There is Hope for Improvement.

Dr. Pershing also said that cognitive function can be improved if vision problems are treated. Regular visits with your ophthalmologist can lead to improvement, and help prevent deterioration.

Almost two-thirds of adults over the age of 70 have hearing loss, yet they remain significantly undertreated. Hearing aids are affordable and accessible. Hearing is again possible with treatment.

Cognitive decline is a problem for seniors, but now that we know the causes we can help prevent deterioration. With this information, our elderly loved ones can live fuller lives, and tackle future health problems.

David York Agency Can Help

Cognitive decline in seniors does not need to be a continuing trend. With the help of trained healthcare professionals your loved ones can learn more about their wellbeing, and fight the problems that come with age. Knowledge and proper care are the keys to living a better life.

If you would like to learn more about David York, please contact us. Our healthcare services are the best available. We provide transportation, care, and companionship to the elderly, as well as specialty services.

For more information about David York Agency’s qualified and compassionate caregivers, contact us at 718.376.7755. A free consultation can help you decide what services will provide the assistance your loved one needs. Also, please like us on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter, Google+, and LinkedIn. We hope to hear from you soon and look forward to providing the very best in care.

Long-Distance Caregiving: Feeling Adequate at a Distance

At a time when seniors wish to remain independent  – and in their own homes – for as long as possible, establishing a support system is essential. The act of caregiving often falls on relatives or close friends, but these caregivers are not always local and long-distance caregiving is on the rise.

Grandparents talking on the phone at the table. Long-distance caregiving

But how can you provide adequate care from a distance while maintaining the balance of your daily life?

Remaining involved in your loved one’s life, providing long-distance care, and living your own life is a difficult balance. The “sandwich generation,” – identified as middle-aged adults “sandwiched” between caring for their children and their aging parents – can be full of overwhelming and thankless tasks, but maintaining your relationship and providing care at a distance can be done!

Here are a few ways to maintain the caregiver relationship when living far away.

 

The Reality of Long-Distance Caregiving

Long-distance caregiving is an undeniable stressor. The difficulty of balancing the duties of a caregiver with work and family can be daunting and exhausting. You will have to learn to manage your time and your loved one’s time simultaneously. You will also have to adapt your schedule to include travel time as well as care time.

Expect to make sacrifices if you plan to maintain significant involvement in your loved one’s life. From missing work to rearranging appointments, your job as a caregiver will be all-encompassing. Frequent phone calls at all hours of the day and night may become a new norm. You may also take on the added expense of additional home care in order to ensure your loved one’s well-being when you cannot be present.

 

What Can I Do?

How can we accept the reality of distance as a barrier but also incorporate ways to embrace it? Finding peace of mind away from your loved one is difficult, but not impossible.

Some ways may include purchasing new forms of technology such as a fall alert system. This is a small investment ensuring that emergency personnel would respond if a loved one suffered a fall. There are also various forms of medication reminders to help loved ones take their medications at the recommended time.

Establish methods of communication that are readily available and easily understood. When utilizing the telephone, your loved one may prefer a landline with multiple cordless phones and charging stations placed around their living area. If your loved one is receptive to video chat, ensure these newfangled programs are installed properly and simplified for ease of use. Many seniors suffer from hearing and vision loss so preset the volume on devices to ensure they can hear properly. Place telephones in locations that are accessible and uncluttered.

 

Helpful Tips from the AARP:

1. Maintain your identity and embrace the characteristics and strengths that you have while incorporating them into caregiving.

2. Reprioritize as circumstances arise.

3. Get organized. Check out these David York Agency publications for the task: Workbook & Checklist.

4. Be open to accepting help whether it be with minimal daily tasks, assistance from other family and friends or hiring a home care agency.

5. “Keep filling your tank.” Caregiving requires mental and emotional energy. Allow yourself to unwind and reboot.

 

Understanding the reality of caregiving and accepting ways to embrace it may ease the struggle of long-distance caregiving. David York Agency prides itself on individualized care and maintaining the dignity of your loved one. If you need assistance, support, or an open ear in the world of caregiving, reach out today!

For more information about David York Agency’s qualified, compassionate caregivers, please contact us at 718.376.7755. If you’d like to hear more from us, please like us on Facebook or follow us on TwitterGoogle+, or LinkedIn.

Managing Long-Distance Caregiving

If you live an hour or more away from a parent or relative who relies on you for some form of care, you are considered a long-distance caregiver. Managing long-distance caregiving is no easy task.  It is stressful and time-consuming and difficult to accomplish without additional help. Being far from your loved one when they need assistance can be draining and, as this role-reversal presents itself, you are thrust into a realm of new responsibilities.

There is no one right method to approach your new role. Every situation is different. But the task of managing long-distance caregiving doesn’t have to be daunting with these helpful tips.

managing long-distance caregiving

How will I know help is needed?

Regrettably, if your parents need care, they probably won’t tell you when they need help. The last thing they want is to become a burden to their children. Typically, a person will experience a health crisis or a “wake-up call,” triggering the awareness that they need assistance. Barring a sudden health event, difficulties and changes in performing ADLs (activities of daily living) will be a telltale sign that help is needed. Routine ADLs include:

  • Bathing and showering
  • Personal hygiene and grooming
  • Dressing
  • Toileting
  • Transferring (for example, moving from a chair to the bed)
  • Self-feeding

 

What is my role?

As a long-distance caregiver, you will play the role of information gatherer as well as coordinator of assistance.

As the information gatherer, you can use websites and other resources to locate local community services that specialize in care for older persons or the disabled. You will also gather relevant data pertaining to your loved one. This information will be your go-to resource in the event of an emergency. David York Agency provides an excellent resource in the form of our Essential Documents and Emergency Information Workbook.

As the coordinator of assistance, you will make arrangements for care as well as set appointments. Consult with your loved one to determine their needs in the following areas:

  • Meal delivery
  • In-home care
  • Medical devices
  • Transportation
  • Help with Medicare/Medicaid claims
  • Support groups
  • Telephone check-ins
  • Financial Assistance

 

Additionally, David York Agency publishes a handy Essential Documents and Emergency Information Checklist to make your new role more manageable. This checklist provides a place to record pertinent information that will help you determine what your loved one can and can’t do. The AARP also offers a Caregiver’s Checklist that may be of use as well.

 

Evolving Care

It is never too early to start thinking about the future needs of your loved ones and how you will handle the evolving nature of your caregiving journey. Once you have completed the caregiver’s checklist and determined the wishes and needs of your loved ones, it will be time to speak to professionals in the caregiving industry. Check references and do whatever you can to make things as straightforward as possible for the caregiver. In-home caregivers help with a variety of household and personal tasks and will be in a good position to update you on day-to-day progress.

Remember that you are not alone.  An estimated 43.5 million Americans provide care, advocacy, and healthcare navigation for a relative or friend 50+ years or older.

 

For more information about David York Agency‘s qualified, compassionate caregivers, contact us online or by phone at 718.376.7755. A free phone consultation can help you decide how to provide your loved ones with the assistance they need. If you’d like to hear more from us, please like us on Facebook or follow us on TwitterGoogle+, or LinkedIn.

Cognitive Support in a Cup of Green Tea

Green tea is well-known for helping induce a calm, alert mental state, but did you know it could also deliver cognitive support? Scientists believe this is due to the unique nutritional aspects of green tea, including high levels of the amino acid Theanine.

This is great news for anyone who would like an extra boost to be at their best every day. Now, research shows that green tea’s mental benefits extend far beyond a daily stimulant. In fact, the compounds in green tea can have a profound impact on cognitive function as we age.

Happy Asian senior woman drinking tea at home.

Cognitive Support is a Sip Away

One study looked at how a history of green tea consumption affects cognitive function in people aged seventy or older. The amount of green tea regularly consumed was compared to their results on tests that measure cognitive function.

Not only was cognitive impairment lower with green tea intake, but the effect was greater when more tea was consumed. A regular green tea habit can help you stay mentally sharp as the years go by.

Powerful Benefits. Today!

Even more exciting is that the benefits of green tea aren’t just preventative. If you or someone you love is already experiencing cognitive decline, it’s not too late to benefit from green tea.

A recent study tested how nursing home residents’ cognitive function test results changed after three months of consuming green tea powder every day. The results showed a significant improvement in cognitive skills with daily green tea powder intake.

Even once cognitive decline begins, the daily use of green tea can supply significant cognitive support.

When caring for someone with cognitive impairment or dementia, it can be hard to find the support you need. For professional, compassionate care, please contact us.

For more information about David York Agency’s qualified, compassionate caregivers, contact us at 718.376.7755. A free phone consultation can help you decide what services might be best to provide you and your loved one with the assistance they need. If you’d like to hear more from us, please like us on Facebook or follow us on TwitterGoogle+, or LinkedIn.

Ageism in Medicine: Senior Mental Health is of Vital Importance

Much as in the general population, senior mental health is of equal importance to physical health.

In fact, the two play off each other.

In 1999, the U.S. surgeon general defined mental health as “the successful performance of mental function, resulting in productive activities, fulfilling relationships with other people, and providing the ability to adapt to change and cope with adversity”. Quality of life suffers when any of these things cannot be done.

Poor mental health can:  affect financial stability; strain families; open up the possibility for crime or victimization, and even negatively impact physical well-being. Unfortunately, mental health is often an area most doctors avoid when treating older patients. This sends the message that depression is normal in the elderly.

Senior mental health and ageism

Sadly, the rate of suicide in the elderly is four times the national average. In addition, 75% of those who committed suicide had seen their primary care doctor within the past month. A study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society funded by the National Institute of Mental Health found that doctors do not spend enough time talking to elderly patients about their mental health. Results also showed that doctors “need more support in how to identify, treat and refer patients to mental health specialists.” Apparently, doctors and need to do more.

Family Advocacy Can Stem Negative Effects of Ageism

In order to advocate for your loved ones, caregivers and family members of the elderly should be aware of the possible signs of mental illness.

These signs can include:

  • Sadness or depression lasting longer than two weeks
  • Loss of interest in hobbies or social activities
  • Unexplained decrease in energy or changes in sleep patterns
  • Difficulties with concentration or decision-making
  • Change in appetite or changes in weight
  • Memory loss, especially short-term memory
  • Feelings of unimportance, misplaced guilt or thoughts of suicide
  • Unexplainable physical setbacks such as aches, constipation, etc.
  • Changes in appearance or problems taking care of the home
  • Struggles with money or working with numbers

Going Forward: Next Steps

In order to better serve our elderly population, doctors should be required to undergo more formal training in geriatrics. Aside from improving the overall health status, understanding the elderly will serve to maintain their mental well-being. Caregivers and family members can protect the mental health of the older adults in their lives by being watchful for the symptoms and advocating for quality care. Therapy, medications and lifestyle changes can all be used to effectively treat mental illness and enable older adults to live longer, fuller lives.

 

David York  Agency is well aware of the issues surrounding aging. We put a premium on personalized services and attention. If you would like more information about David York Agency’s qualified, compassionate caregivers, contact us online or by phone at 718.376.7755. A free phone consultation can help you decide how to provide your loved ones with the assistance they need. If you’d like to hear more from us, please like us on Facebook or follow us on TwitterGoogle+, or LinkedIn.