3 Senior-Friendly Vacation Spots In Europe

Millions of visitors visit the Eiffel Tower, Buckingham Palace, and the Louvre each year. Europe is undeniably one of the most popular tourist destinations in the world. Beautiful locations abound, capturing the imagination and delighting the senses. Above all, the vast continent welcomes people of all ages and from all walks of life. Whether you’re traveling alone or with a loved one, the European experience remains with you long after your trip is over.

Couple on a senior-friendly vacation in Europe

Family vacations should be all about inclusivity. Europe isn’t just for the young; it’s for everyone who appreciates unique experiences and incredible opportunities. Below are 3 of our favorite recommendations for a senior-friendly vacation.

Milan

Italy has a diverse landscape that provides a stunning backdrop to its deeply-rooted cultural traditions. It’s certainly a favorite with tourists. Of the many destinations in the country, Milan provides the highest level of accessibility for seniors. In 2016, Milan won the EU Access City Award for promoting Universal Design standards for public spaces. The iconic city was recognized for its exhaustive work in removing architectural and social barriers to independent living. Therefore, Milan is a great destination for the elderly and handicapped. To date, all of Milan’s modern subways are fully handicap accessible.

Berlin

This friendly city is a must for seniors who enjoy traveling. It is undeniably modern, yet rich in history and culture. Berlin received an extensive renovation after the bombing campaigns of World War II. As a result, the city’s state-of-the-art architecture is the envy of other cities in Europe. For example, there are elevators in most multi-story buildings. This increases the overall accessibility for seniors and disabled persons. Much of Berlin’s public transit system is also wheelchair-friendly. In 2013, Berlin won the EU Access City Award. Moreover, the city has committed to a 100% accessible and barrier-free environment by 2020.

Ireland

The Emerald Isle is a land of romance. Its lush landscape is flanked by scenic coasts and adored by those who treasure an excellent quality of life. In recent years, the country has increased its efforts to make the best of Ireland accessible to everyone. To date, Ireland’s National Journey Planner System provides travel information for those with mobility challenges. Additionally, many of Dublin’s public buses are wheelchair-accessible. There are even wheelchair-accessible taxis in the city!

As can be seen, Europe is an attractive destination if you’re thinking of traveling with seniors. With a little bit of planning, you can enjoy a relaxing, stress-free vacation.

At David York home healthcare agency, our focus is on improving the quality of life for seniors. If you would like more information on how providing care to your loved one can benefit your family, contact us today! We are happy to answer all questions.

For more information about David York Agency’s qualified, compassionate caregivers, contact us at (877) 216-7676. A free phone consultation can help you decide what services might be best. We aim to provide you and your loved one with the assistance they need. If you’d like to hear more from us, please like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter, Google+, or LinkedIn

Enjoy a Safe Summer While Aging in Place

As the summer months quickly approach, vacations and outdoor activities are on everyone’s mind. Seniors who are aging in place while living far from family and friends know that the summer months are perfect for traveling. Take a look at these tips to ensure you and your elderly loved one are ready for a safe and enjoyable summer.

A mature woman in her 70's gets out of the car of a friend helping her with an airport drop off, the woman handing her her luggage at the departure car area. She has a cheerful smile on her face, holding walking cane for support. Aging in place travel day

Plan Summer Activities and Vacation in Advance

Start planning for summer activities and destination trips as early as possible. If you plan to engage in outdoor activities consider whether you will require assistance.  Keep a detailed schedule and make changes as necessary. Make copies of the schedule and keep one visibly posted for friends, family, and caregivers.

Discuss Your Summer Plans With Your Doctor

Discuss your plans to travel or engage in summer activities with a healthcare professional. Receiving a clean bill of health gives you peace of mind about participating in activities and traveling long distances. If you take prescribed medications, be sure to ask about refills and notable side effects. If traveling with a pre-existing condition, ask your doctor to write up your medical history and treatment instructions just in case.

Arrange for Special Accommodations Before Traveling

Make special accommodations for you or a senior loved one well in advance of your travel dates. Pre-boarding flights, special dietary needs, electric scooters, and cost-free wheelchairs are a few accommodations that are obtainable ahead of time. Note, summer is a popular time for traveling, so last minute accommodations might be refused by a hotel, airline, train, or car rental the day of travel or while en route.

Hire a Home Health Aide/Traveling Companion

Some seniors love to travel but have trouble doing so alone. Hiring a home health aide or travel companion is a great option. These hired professionals also help with numerous of daily living activities. Caregivers can also help schedule trips, make travel arrangements, carry luggage, and run errands.

Research Local Hospitals and Doctors

Create a list of the hospitals and medical centers that are closest to your vacation spot. Although summer vacations and activities are exciting, they can also cause stress and overexertion. Remember, it is best not to plan too many activities for one day. Space activities out and give yourself a chance to relax.

Stay Hydrated and Avoid Dehydration

Dehydration leads to all types of medical problems. Whether traveling by car, plane, train or engaging in summer activities, it is imperative to take in enough fluids. Always keep a couple of bottles of water on hand and sip constantly throughout the day. Don’t forget to calculate bathroom breaks when traveling by vehicle.

Contact David York Agency for Professional Caregiving

For more information about David York Agency’s qualified, compassionate caregivers, please contact us at 718.376.7755. If you’d like to hear more from us, please like us on Facebook or follow us on TwitterGoogle+, or LinkedIn.

Simple Tips for Healthy Dementia Care

Healthy Dementia Care Strategies

Dementia is a difficult condition to live with, but it also affects caregivers. Caring for patients with dementia leaves many caregivers overwhelmed and exhausted. Hard to understand and often invisible to the eye, dementia makes it hard to determine whether care is effective. But, if you practice healthy dementia care, you can reduce or overcome the intrinsic challenges and provide necessary care to the patient.

Senior woman with her home caregiver. Healthy Dementia Care concept

Use Smart Communication

Communicating with dementia patients requires simple, straightforward methods. Use easy-to-understand words and suggestions, and don’t overload your loved one with a string of questions or commands. Give them time to process your words so they don’t become overwhelmed or agitated. Simple yes or no questions or one-step directions are far more helpful than complex queries or multiple-step demands.

 

Play Music

Music has a profound effect on many people with dementia, particularly if that music is familiar. Music can soothe agitation, improve mood, and reduce stress. Even people with advanced Alzheimer’s have responded to music therapy when nothing else has worked, indicating that musical memories outlast other kinds of memories.

 

Practice Self-Care

Although people with dementia are not deliberately trying to test your patience, they often end up doing so. Caring for a person with dementia requires patience, compassion, and energy. Therefore, those who care for people with dementia must take the time and effort to preserve their own health.

It’s easy to let regular exercise and proper nutrition slide, but maintaining these habits is vital. The healthier the caregiver, the healthier the patient. People with dementia need a reliable, healthy person to depend on, so don’t forget to take care of yourself.

 

Understand Aggression

Dementia can often drive sufferers to respond aggressively. Unfortunately, this aggression is often directed at those who are trying to help. In these moments, it’s important not to take the person’s anger personally. Remember, though you can’t see it, the patient is in pain. Aggression is often a result of physical discomfort, confusion, poor communication, time of day, and environmental factors.

Never respond in kind and do not ignore the aggressive behavior. Instead, try to determine the cause of the aggression. Is the person in physical discomfort? Does the aggression always happen at a certain time of day or within a certain environment? If so, is there a way to relieve pain and discomfort, alter the environment, or plan ahead by scheduling naps or eating patterns to reduce sundowning?

 

Get Help from Professional Caregivers

Caring for a person with dementia is challenging, but it does not need to be overwhelming. Keeping a few of the above tips in mind can help you face the task with confidence and help you provide the support, and the quality care your loved one needs. If you find you still have questions or would prefer to work with a professional caregiver, David York Agency is here to help.

For more information about David York Agency’s qualified, compassionate caregivers, contact us at 718.376.7755. A free phone consultation can help you decide what services might be best. We aim to provide you and your loved one with the assistance they need. If you’d like to hear more from us, please like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter, Google+, or LinkedIn.

5 Easy Places to Visit with Your Caregiver

If there’s one thing seniors cherish, it’s driving. Today’s seniors lived through the age of cheap gasoline and enjoyed road trips. Driving holds a strong positive association with our senior population and losing the ability to drive is correlated with senior depression. Giving up your keys doesn’t mean you have to stay at home. Mobility is still possible by traveling with your caregiver.

If you’re sick of doing crossword puzzles at home, talk to your caregiver about going out instead. Traveling with your caregiver goes well beyond errands and doctor’s appointments. Traveling with your caregiver is a great way to get out and about while still receiving the care you need. If you love the freedom of driving on your own schedule, an in-home caregiver can help!

In many cases, caregivers related to the patient can drive their elderly relative around for a change of scenery and to get some fresh air. If that is not an easy option, there are many transportation services such as access-a-ride which is subsidized and private services like Uber and Lyft which are easy, affordable options.

Let’s take a look at some places you and your caregiver can visit. Elderly and family at a church service

Visiting Your Relatives

When you stop driving, it becomes more difficult to see your relatives without relying on them to visit you. However, talk to your caregiver. If you enjoy visiting nearby friends and relations, your caregiver can accompany you. Once you have planned a time that works for everyone, you and your caregiver can make all the arrangements. You can even ask them to help you bake a little gift to bring along.

Meeting Friends in the Senior Center

Senior centers have been an integral part of any senior communities for many decades. These large halls provide plenty of room for events, catered lunches, and card games. Whether you’re there for a special occasion, meeting a group of friends, or want to spend some time with people your own age, there’s plenty for you and your caregiver to do at a senior center.

Attend Church or Community Activities

Many seniors are deeply involved in their communities and churches. The loss of mobility does not need to affect this involvement! Your caregiver can help you reclaim these activities and volunteer opportunities. Plan with your caregiver to ensure that the events you want to attend are within your daily schedule.

Join a Club or Class

One of the best ways to keep your mind active is to continue learning. Pick up a hobby that keeps your mind, and hands occupied. Hobby classes and craft classes are readily available at senior centers and throughout the community. Build birdhouses, knit a sweater, or learn the art of scrapbooking! There’s a wide range of crafts in which to participate, and your caregiver can easily shuttle you to and from classes.

Enjoy a Drive

Finally, there is a simple joy in “taking a drive.” Now that you’re the passenger, you have the freedom to look out any window you please. Ask your caregiver if she’s amenable to a relaxing country drive and engage in some leisurely recreational driving. Enjoy a quiet opportunity to listen to the radio, talk, or enjoy the view.

Professional Caregiving From David York Agency

Just because you don’t drive anymore doesn’t mean you have to stop going out. Just because you shouldn’t be behind the wheel doesn’t mean you have to give up on the freedom of travel. Escorting you is one of the core services of senior caregiving, and your caregiver should be glad to help you stay active and engaged in your community with a few car trips.

For more information about David York Agency’s qualified, compassionate caregivers, contact us at 718.376.7755. A free phone consultation can help you decide what services might be best. Our aim is to provide you and your loved one with the assistance they need. If you’d like to hear more from us, please like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter, Google+, or LinkedIn.

 

Vitamin D is Important for Senior Health

Vitamin D is Still an Important Factor Regarding Senior Health

When you are involved in elderly caregiving in NY and Long Island, it’s important to remember that Vitamin D is important for senior health. The recommended amount of vitamin D for senior citizens over the age of 71 is 800 IU a day, but a simple blood test can determine if you are taking in the correct amount for your age group.

Vitamin D is a natural vitamin that the body produces in response to sunlight. Vitamin D allows the body to absorb calcium, which is important for healthy, strong bones. Unfortunately, too many elderly men and women are not getting enough vitamin D, which can lead to high blood pressure, brittle bones and autoimmune disorders.

Not Just Sun- Getting Vitamin D for Senior Health Inside

Lots of people believe they get enough Vitamin D from natural sunshine. However, elderly men and women are often deficient due to an inability to get outside. Whether because of weather limitations or limited mobility, seniors don’t necessarily have the same outdoor access as their younger counterparts.

Spending an hour or so a day in the sun is the first step, but when that isn’t an option it’s extremely easy to get the amount that you need by eating the right types of foods. Many are already fortified with this vitamin, such as milk, certain dairy products and cereals. Tuna, cheese, egg yolks, tofu and pork are just a few more vitamin D enriched foods. Supplements are also a great source of vitamin D.

Lower Health Risks to Seniors

Seniors who regularly take vitamin D will lower their risk for osteoporosis, diabetes and cardiovascular problems. Vitamin D is important for senior health, fortifying bones and offering protection in the event of an elderly fall. Your caregiver can remind you to take your vitamin D, ensuring you stay on track. For more information concerning elderly caregiving in Long Island, NY, please contact us today.

For more information about David York Agency’s qualified, compassionate caregivers, contact us at 718.376.7755. A free phone consultation can help you decide what services might be best to provide you and your loved one with the assistance they need. If you’d like to hear more from us, please like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter, Google+, or LinkedIn.

Ride-Sharing For Seniors: Motivator For Technology Adoption

One of the sad facts of aging is that people lose the ability to safely operate a motor vehicle. This is largely due to deteriorating vision along with other health-related issues. Telling an aging loved one that he or she can no longer drive can be painful for all concerned (see our previous post Don’t Take Away My Car Keys, Yet!). Though it is a matter of safety it is also a matter of freedom. But ride-sharing for seniors offers freedom and safety at the touch of a button.

An elderly woman is smiling as she enters through the front passenger door of a car. Uber ride-sharing for seniors concept

Ride-Sharing For Seniors

The loss of mobility has been an unavoidable part of aging since the dawn of the automobile. Until recently, many elderly people depended on rides from friends, relatives 0r other community organizations (see our previous post No More Car for Dad or Mom, Now What?). However, technology is changing this old expectation. Ride-sharing services are now available in many communities, offering a cheap, easy, and reliable option for local travel. Offered by companies such as Uber and Lyft, ride-sharing is a convenient way for seniors to get around.

Ride-sharing for seniors ensures that your loved ones are not completely homebound or dependent upon others for rides. This option can also help lessen the blow of having to take away your loved one’s car keys. Thanks to ride-sharing services, the elderly no longer have to endure the loss of mobility that comes with age.

 

Teaching the Technology

Teaching your loved ones to use ride-sharing apps may be a necessary step to ensure their independence. Luckily, these applications they are simple enough for anyone to pick up with a few lessons. Also, they have the added benefit of concretely introducing technology to seniors and act as motivators for their adoption. Both libraries and senior centers offer technology classes to seniors, providing an excellent resource in this area. Additionally, home healthcare workers can help guide seniors through the ins and outs of the technology. With a little time and patience, you can get your elderly parent on the road in safety.

 

David York Can Help

For more information about David York Agency’s qualified, compassionate caregivers, please contact us at 718.376.7755. If you’d like to hear more from us, please like us on Facebook or follow us on TwitterGoogle+, or LinkedIn.

Helpful Technology for Seniors: Recharge Your Life

Technology has become a way of life and will only continue to increase in prevalence – even for the senior population. Instead of shying away from the latest innovations, seniors can embrace devices that have the potential to enhance their independence as well as their quality of life. There’s a wealth of helpful technology for seniors, many of whom are recharging their lives with the help of gadgets. Take a look!

Telecommunication Technology Togetherness Concept

 

Promoting Independence

Seniors typically take several medications per day and this daily task can become overwhelming. The number of medications prescribed as well as the frequency of dosages is easy to forget. The risk of medication errors has always been high but rarely addressed. However, many devices have implemented apps and voice assistants which provide reminders and alarms set to the individual’s needs. Some devices also allow family members to check on the well-being of loved ones with wireless sensors. These unintrusive devices allow seniors to remain as independent as possible.

Social Connections

Some seniors face feelings of isolation and are unable to readily connect with family and friends. The use of social media has helped counteract these feelings. The age of waiting for phone calls or letter to arrive is over. Now, seniors can experience the instant satisfaction of receiving brief texts, seeing pictures posted or using webcams to check in with the people they care most about.

Overcoming Technological Intimidation

At times, seniors have had an attitude of skepticism toward technology. This is likely due to continuous product revisions and ongoing updates and advancements. According to a Pew Research Center study, a significant majority of older adults say they need assistance when it comes to using new digital devices. A mere 18% feel comfortable learning to use new devices on their own. In contrast, 77% indicate they would need someone to walk them through the process.

To overcome this fear, seniors with tech-savvy friends or caregivers can request help as needed. Education is also provided by senior centers and libraries as well as your local Office of Aging.

Technology is always moving forward and it’s easy to feel left behind. However, embracing technology can greatly enhance the quality of life for many seniors. From promoting independence and social connections to stimulating the mind with ongoing education, technology is a great tool for seniors.

David York Agency Can Help

For more information about David York Agency’s qualified, compassionate caregivers, please contact us at 718.376.7755. If you’d like to hear more from us, please like us on Facebook or follow us on TwitterGoogle+, or LinkedIn.

Eldercare Planning: Your Parents & Home Healthcare

Many adult children start to worry about their aging parents. They see them struggling as they get on in years and believe they would be better off with help. Eldercare planning is a difficult subject to broach (especially with seniors who are resistant to such discussions see our post on the subject), but it’s also a necessary conversation for seniors who are experiencing a decline in health or finding it hard to care for themselves.

 

Eldercare Planning for Parents

Approaching Eldercare Planning with Your Parents

Conversations about diminished capacity can be very difficult to have with your parents. They may get offended that you are worried about them and they may have no interest in hearing your viewpoint. It can be frustrating for you to make your concerns clear. However, it doesn’t have to be that way!

Here are some tips to help you through this discussion.

  • Choose the right time. Don’t think that you are going to talk to your parents when you both have five minutes. This conversation cannot be rushed. Instead, find some time that you are all free to sit down and talk.
  • If possible, include all of the children. It can be helpful if all of the children are on the same page. Otherwise, it might look like you are ganging up on your parents.
  • Be prepared with the options. It is important that you are ready to have the talk. Write down the different options that are available to your parents. Prepare a list of pros and cons, as well as the costs associated with each of them.
  • If it gets heated, take a break. The conversation may get heated, and it may be better to take a break before things get said that can’t be taken back. Leave the list of options, pros, and cons, and plan on coming back in a day or two (after your parents have had time to think).

Difficult Now, Helpful When Necessary

Talking to your aging parents about getting help can be quite difficult. However, if you find the right time and come prepared, it is more likely to go well. If not, take a break and revisit the issue once everyone has settled down. David York Agency has a Checklist and Workbook to help guide you through the discussion. Please check them out on our website.

Remember, though this discussion is difficult now, it could lead to a better future for your parents. Decide on small changes that can be implemented now and others that will be helpful down the road.

 

If eldercare planning is a concern for you and your loved ones, please consider the David York Agency. Our qualified, compassionate caregivers are ready to help. Contact us online or by phone at 718.376.7755. A free phone consultation can help you decide how to provide your loved ones with the assistance they need.

If you’d like to hear more from us, please like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter, Google+, or LinkedIn.

Small Changes that Make Aging-In-Place at Home Easy

Aging at home is more desirable than moving to assisted living. This is called Aging-In-Place. In fact, the AARP reports that 90% of seniors plan to age at home. However, most senior homes are not equipped for the comfort, convenience, and safety of the elderly. So, how can you or your loved one achieve a senior-friendly home?

Aging at home senior riding his stairlift with a cane in home setting.

Fortunately, floor-to-ceiling renovations are not necessary. Instead, a few small changes will go a long way to improving senior quality of life and relieving pressure on home healthcare workers.

Consider these important tips for home modifications that make aging at home easy:

 

Safety, Security, and Aging at Home

Seniors are more likely than younger people to experience falls and accidents. As such, preparing to age at home requires special attention for safety and security.

Start by tackling lighting. Sufficient lighting makes a big difference for seniors experiencing diminished eyesight. Seniors need two or three times as much light in order to see, so the addition of light fixtures and wide windows is recommended. Make sure that desks, tables and sewing machines have task lighting available. Also, consider repainting dark rooms in light, glare-free colors.

Remove throw rugs and obstacles that could cause a fall. Minimize slipping by treating non-carpeted areas with non-slip sealant. If feasible, consider swapping hardwood and tile floors for carpeting.

Don’t forget the outside of your home! Add outdoor lighting, including guide lights along paths, and clear shrubs and clutter from paths, decks, and patios.

Also, consider installing an alarm or “panic” system that allows the homeowner to call for help in the event of a fall.

 

Mobility and Convenience

If you use a walker or a wheelchair, you may need to widen your doorways. A cheaper and easier alternative is re-hanging doors with swing clear hinges. These allow the door to open all the way and make standard doors wheelchair accessible quickly and easily. Also, if your house is multi-level, you may want to install a chairlift. Finally, replace doorknobs with lever handles and standard light switches with rockers, both of which are much easier for arthritic hands.

The kitchen and bathroom are particular areas of concern in terms of convenience and safety. Step-in showers are best for seniors. A walk-in tub is another alternative, but is often more expensive. Add grab bars to showers and toilets for additional support.

In the kitchen, induction cooktops may be better than traditional stoves since there are no open flames and dishwashers with drawers reduce the need to bend down. Ensure the most-used cooking and dining supplies are in cabinets as close to eye level as possible.

 

Self-Reliance

If you are making home modifications for a senior relative, remember: they know what they need. The goal should not be to reduce their independence but to enhance it, reducing their reliance on you and home health aides while aging in their own home.

The most important thing to remember is that small changes can be better than larger ones. In many cases there are cheap and easy options that can alleviate small stresses. Even small things like “reachers” or talking clocks can make a huge difference to you or your relative’s quality of life.

 

For more information about David York Agency’s qualified, compassionate caregivers, contact us online or by phone at 718.376.7755. A free phone consultation can help you decide how to provide your loved ones with the assistance they need. If you’d like to hear more from us, please like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter, Google+, or LinkedIn.

Long-Distance Caregiving: Feeling Adequate at a Distance

At a time when seniors wish to remain independent  – and in their own homes – for as long as possible, establishing a support system is essential. The act of caregiving often falls on relatives or close friends, but these caregivers are not always local and long-distance caregiving is on the rise.

Grandparents talking on the phone at the table. Long-distance caregiving

But how can you provide adequate care from a distance while maintaining the balance of your daily life?

Remaining involved in your loved one’s life, providing long-distance care, and living your own life is a difficult balance. The “sandwich generation,” – identified as middle-aged adults “sandwiched” between caring for their children and their aging parents – can be full of overwhelming and thankless tasks, but maintaining your relationship and providing care at a distance can be done!

Here are a few ways to maintain the caregiver relationship when living far away.

 

The Reality of Long-Distance Caregiving

Long-distance caregiving is an undeniable stressor. The difficulty of balancing the duties of a caregiver with work and family can be daunting and exhausting. You will have to learn to manage your time and your loved one’s time simultaneously. You will also have to adapt your schedule to include travel time as well as care time.

Expect to make sacrifices if you plan to maintain significant involvement in your loved one’s life. From missing work to rearranging appointments, your job as a caregiver will be all-encompassing. Frequent phone calls at all hours of the day and night may become a new norm. You may also take on the added expense of additional home care in order to ensure your loved one’s well-being when you cannot be present.

 

What Can I Do?

How can we accept the reality of distance as a barrier but also incorporate ways to embrace it? Finding peace of mind away from your loved one is difficult, but not impossible.

Some ways may include purchasing new forms of technology such as a fall alert system. This is a small investment ensuring that emergency personnel would respond if a loved one suffered a fall. There are also various forms of medication reminders to help loved ones take their medications at the recommended time.

Establish methods of communication that are readily available and easily understood. When utilizing the telephone, your loved one may prefer a landline with multiple cordless phones and charging stations placed around their living area. If your loved one is receptive to video chat, ensure these newfangled programs are installed properly and simplified for ease of use. Many seniors suffer from hearing and vision loss so preset the volume on devices to ensure they can hear properly. Place telephones in locations that are accessible and uncluttered.

 

Helpful Tips from the AARP:

1. Maintain your identity and embrace the characteristics and strengths that you have while incorporating them into caregiving.

2. Reprioritize as circumstances arise.

3. Get organized. Check out these David York Agency publications for the task: Workbook & Checklist.

4. Be open to accepting help whether it be with minimal daily tasks, assistance from other family and friends or hiring a home care agency.

5. “Keep filling your tank.” Caregiving requires mental and emotional energy. Allow yourself to unwind and reboot.

 

Understanding the reality of caregiving and accepting ways to embrace it may ease the struggle of long-distance caregiving. David York Agency prides itself on individualized care and maintaining the dignity of your loved one. If you need assistance, support, or an open ear in the world of caregiving, reach out today!

For more information about David York Agency’s qualified, compassionate caregivers, please contact us at 718.376.7755. If you’d like to hear more from us, please like us on Facebook or follow us on TwitterGoogle+, or LinkedIn.