Recover from Cataract Surgery with Assistance

woman eye exam

Our sight diminishes with age, which naturally has an impact on our quality of life and our ability to live independently. According to the CDC, 20.5 million Americans over the age of 40 suffer from cataracts.  The good news is that cataracts disease is treatable with cataract surgery. With a little help, continuing to live on your own is entirely possible.

The National Eye Institute defines a cataract as “a clouding of the lens in the eye that affects vision.” This cloudiness can affect one or both eyes and is not transferred from one eye to the other. As people age, the proteins in the eyes can clump together, forming the cloud over the lens. Smaller clumps may not affect vision, but they will continue to grow over time. A cataract may also change the color of the lens of the eye, gradually tinting it brown. Some of the symptoms that cataract sufferers will notice include: blurry vision, faded colors or inability to identify blues and purples, double vision, and poor night vision.

New glasses and brighter lighting in your home may provide temporary relief. However, if cataracts interfere with daily activities, the only truly effective treatment is surgery. The operation is simple, but it may require anesthesia (depending on your risk factors and personal preference). Care after surgery can be crucial in ensuring your eyesight returns appropriately.

In the first couple of days after surgery, you will experience mild discomfort. In the first few weeks, your doctor will recommend you avoid heavy lifting and bending at the waist. Healing is not fully complete for eight weeks. During your recovery period, home health care services could be of great assistance to you.

YOU’LL NEED HELP

After surgery, a home health aide can assist with housekeeping duties, grocery shopping, and transportation to and from follow-up doctor’s appointments. In addition, a home healthcare agency has supervising registered nurses to give direction and guidance to the home health aides. This can be a significant aid during recovery as there are risks associated with cataract surgery. While problems like loss of vision, infection, bleeding, and inflammation are rare, having someone there to provide insight and help get you prompt medical attention can prevent permanent damage.

If you are suffering from cataracts and are considering cataract surgery, contact us to discuss how we can assist with your individual needs. Cataract surgery can improve your quality of life and preserve your independence. Let our quality, personalized home care aid you back to healthy vision.

At David York Agency, it is our mission to provide the highest-quality support services to the aged, infirmed, and disabled. Our highly trained and vetted professionals can provide your family with a level of in-home assistance that meets your needs.

For more information about our qualified, compassionate caregivers, contact us at 718.376.7755. A free phone consultation can help you decide what services might be best for you and your loved ones.

If you’d like to hear more from us, please like us on Facebook or follow us on TwitterGoogle+, or LinkedIn.

Caregiver Stress Needs to Be Taken Seriously

Caregiver Stress Needs Serious Attention

Caregiver Stress is Real

Caregivers experience stress just as frequently as anyone else. Unfortunately, they are often dismiss it. It’s assumed that caregiver stress is an expectation that comes with the job. People feel that the stress should be tolerated, like learning to cope with long, boring commutes.

Caregiver Stress Has Medical Consequences

In fact, caregiver stress can cause demonstrable medical problems. Those who take on the responsibility of caring for aging or ailing individuals need to stay healthy themselves. They should not fall into the trap of denial. Just because they’re helping others does not mean they won’t need help themselves. Round-the-clock care can lead to running on lack of sleep or lack of food – both causes of declining health. Caregivers do not receive the amount of healthcare monitoring they themselves deliver, so self-care is exceedingly important.

Patients Can Suffer As a Result of Caregiver Stress

When caregivers deny their own health needs, it isn’t just negative for them. According to some recent research from UC Berkeley, patients suffering from dementia will have a shorter life expectancy if their caregivers experience persistent untreated anxiety or depression.

As many as 40 percent of dementia caregivers suffer from depression. Though the problem is widespread, it is rarely discussed. Those who experience caregiver stress should not feel as if the problem is unusual or that it reflects poorly on them as people. The job is fraught with emotional and physical realities that are often sad. These sad realities naturally lead to stress often culminating in depression. This occupational hazard is an issue that needs to be addressed.

Working Through Caregiver Stress

There are many resources available for caregiver stress, including groups that provide social support and therapists who specialize in helping people cope with caregiver stress. Of course, many people will be able to overcome caregiver stress if they reach out to others in order to get some help with their responsibilities.

Home health aides can work with caregivers in order to provide the best possible standards of assistance for the patients. Being a caregiver is difficult, and getting more support can make all the difference in the world.

An Additional David York Agency Service

David York Home Healthcare can refer you to an agency to help you work through the caregiver stress and feelings of depression you may be experiencing. We can also recommend services that target depression in the elderly, should your loved one be experiencing mental health problems. Please contact us for more information on caregiver stress and related issues.

For more information about David York Agency’s qualified, compassionate caregivers, contact us at 718.376.7755. A free phone consultation can help you decide what services might be best to provide you and your loved one with the assistance they need. If you’d like to hear more from us, please like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter, Google+, or LinkedIn.

Ageism in Medicine: The Elderly Need Preventive Care Too

ageism elderly preventative carePreventive care is used to find and maintain a good personal health standard. During a preventive visit, your doctor will look at a number of factors to determine what vaccines, screenings, and lab work are necessary for you. These factors include age, gender, current level of health, health history, and any current symptoms you are experiencing.

Unfortunately, it’s common for the elderly to not receive proper preventive care, including important health screenings and vaccinations. According to the Center for Disease Control, in 2003, nine of every 10 adults over the age of 65 did not receive the appropriate screenings.

Preventive care has many benefits. Preventing disease and illness reduces overall healthcare costs. Healthy, working adults are more productive and attend work more consistently. Most importantly, preventive care allows seniors to remain independent longer, promoting not only physical health, but also mental and emotional health.

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force lists five different screenings as part of their recommendations for older adults:

  • Breast cancer screening every other year for women aged 40 years or older
  • Colorectal cancer screening for adults aged 50 to 75
  • Type 2 Diabetes screening for adults aged 40 to 70 who are also overweight
  • Lipid disorder screening for adults aged 40 to 75
  • Routine Osteoporosis screening for women aged 65 and older. Women who are found to have an increased risk of fracture should begin screening earlier.

In addition to receiving the proper screenings, the USPSTF also recommends that clinicians ask all adults about their tobacco use. Tobacco cessation counseling is covered under Medicare Part B for up to eight visits with a qualified doctor in a 12-month period.

On top of screenings, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommends that everyone over the age of six months receive a yearly influenza vaccination. A Rand Corporation Study done in 2003 shows that getting the influenza vaccine reduces hospitalizations and deaths among the elderly as a result of the flu virus. They also recommend a pneumococcal vaccination for those aged 65 and older. This vaccine can prevent a serious bloodstream infection.

To develop these recommendations, the USPSTF and ACIP collected data from self-reported surveys. Despite the fact that this data is dependent on the ability of the adult to remember when they last received specific preventive care, these experts believe that there are gaps in the use of preventive services. These gaps vary by race, gender, insurance coverage, and education level.

In order to reduce the number of elderly Americans not receiving the proper preventive care, local, state, and national plans have been implemented. These include things like reducing out-of-pocket costs, promoting annual wellness visits, client reminders for screenings and other tests, distributing videos and brochures to raise awareness about available services, providing transportation to medical facilities for the elderly, and expanding healthcare to take place at the patient’s home, church, or other facility.

As the old saying goes, “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” If you’re interested in helping a loved one maintain their health and their independence, a home health care assistant may be able to provide the support you need. At David York Agency, our healthcare professionals can help to ensure that your loved one is receiving the proper preventive care.

For more information about David York Agency’s qualified, compassionate caregivers, contact us at 718.376.7755. A free consultation can help you decide what services might be best to provide you and your loved one with the assistance they need.

If you’d like to hear more from us, please like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter, Google+, or LinkedIn.

Tips to Avert Elderly Falls

Regular exercise helps maintain muscle mass and improve balance

 

Falling poses a serious risk to the elderly. According to an article published by the CDC, over one-quarter of Americans over the age of 65 fall each year, making falling the number one cause of injury, both fatal and non-fatal, in this age group.

Falling not only poses a physical threat but also threatens one’s independence, self-confidence, and socialization. The elderly person’s mental and physical welfare, therefore, depends on preventing a fall to begin with.

While elderproofing the home is a necessary step toward fall prevention, focusing on the individual may provide them with benefits far beyond that.

Some of the areas to focus on include:

  • Regular Exercise: Techniques such as yoga and tai chi focus on balance directly, while weight-bearing exercises, especially for the lower body, may prevent bone loss and help maintain muscle mass.
  • Physical Therapy: Physical therapy may be beneficial to recover properly from a previous injury, surgery, or chronic condition.
  • Check Vision and Hearing: Keep up on checkups for vision and hearing. Outdated eyeglass prescriptions may cause blurred vision, which can contribute to falling. Additionally, undiagnosed auditory deficits can directly affect your balance.
  • Dizziness: Even seemingly minor dizziness may indicate something much more significant, such as blood sugar issues, poor circulation, or low blood pressure.
  • Medications: Be sure to understand each medication taken, paying particular attention to those that may cause dizziness or drowsiness.
  • Stand Up Slowly: Getting up slowly reduces the likelihood of lightheadedness due to blood pressure drops. In addition, gentle movements may decrease the risk of injury to older muscles and joints.
  • Footwear: Rubber soled shoes with no or a very low heel are best to prevent slipping. Be certain that the shoes fit properly. Shoes that leave room for swelling feet may be loose, which can contribute to the risk of falling.
  • Alcohol: Limit the amount of alcohol consumed. Not only can alcohol interact with other medications taken, but alcohol itself has a disorienting effect on the individual.
  • Sleep: Getting the proper amount of sleep may reduce fatigue, increase alertness, and improve pain tolerance.

 

Focus on the Individual Elderly Person

A full assessment of each individual with respect to their risk factors for a fall will go a long way toward keeping them safe from a fall. Fall prevention within the elderly community can be enhanced by having a home healthcare aide present, either full-time or part-time, to ensure that your elderly loved one has someone nearby to assist them if they do experience a fall.

At David York Agency, we are committed to providing the personalized and dedicated care that people need as they age. For more information about David York Agency’s qualified, compassionate caregivers, contact us at 718.376.7755. A free consultation can help you decide what services might be best to provide you and your loved one with the assistance you need.

If you’d like to hear more from us, please like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter, Google+, or LinkedIn.

Why Vitamin D Is So Important for Senior Health

vitamin d for senior health

When you are involved in elderly caregiving in NY and Long Island, it’s important to remember that all seniors need the proper amount of vitamin D in their diets. Vitamin D is a natural vitamin that the body produces in response to sunlight. It can also be taken in through diet and supplements.

Vitamin D allows the body to absorb calcium, which is so important for healthy, strong bones. Unfortunately, too many elderly men and women are not getting enough vitamin D by diet alone, and this deficiency can lead to high blood pressure, brittle bones, and autoimmune disorders. A simple blood test can determine if you are taking in the correct amount for your age group.

Not Just From the Sun: Getting Vitamin D Inside

Many people believe they get enough of this vitamin simply from being out in the sun, and that is certainly true for a large part of the population. However, elderly men and women are often vitamin D deficient because many seniors cannot get outside due to the weather or limited mobility.

Spending an hour or so a day in the sun is the first step, but when that isn’t an option, it’s extremely easy to get the amount that you need by eating the right types of foods. The recommended amount of vitamin D for senior citizens over the age of 71 is 800 IU a day. Many are already fortified with this vitamin, such as milk, certain dairy products, and cereals. Tuna, cheese, egg yolks, tofu, and pork are just a few more vitamin-D-enriched foods. Supplements are also a great source of vitamin D.

Lower Osteoporosis Risk

Seniors who take vitamin D as part of their daily routine will lower their risk for osteoporosis, diabetes, and cardiovascular problems. This vitamin will help keep their bones strong, which is important in the event of a fall.

If you are caring for an elderly person with a vitamin D deficiency, a home health aide can help. The aide can remind your loved one to take supplements recommended or prescribed by a doctor, including vitamin D.

At David York Agency, we understand the fears and challenges that growing older and not getting enough nutrients can present, not just for the person affected, but for everyone in their life. We provide families with the support and care they need to ensure their loved one is as happy and healthy as possible.

For more information about David York Agency’s qualified, compassionate caregivers, contact us at 718.376.7755. A free consultation can help you decide what services might be best to provide you and your loved one with the assistance you need.
If you’d like to hear more from us, please like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter, Google+, or LinkedIn.

Senior Care: Scientists Find Foods that May Slow the Signs of Aging

foods that may stop signs of aging

Back in the day, when your mother told you to eat your broccoli, you might have hidden it in your napkin or fed it to the family dog, but it turns out Mom was right. Of course, vegetables are always a healthy choice, but a new study shows that broccoli and other greens do even more than we thought when it comes to nutrition and longevity in seniors.

While many joke about finding the fountain of youth, researchers from the Washington University School of Medicine may have found some evidence that it has been right in front of us all along.

As we get older, many of us deal with the same health issues. In addition to the wrinkles and graying hair, metabolism slows down, causing weight issues to creep up. Almost all older adults wear corrective lenses to correct eyesight, and many suffer from glaucoma or cataracts. Others develop problems with blood sugar levels, which can lead to a number of related health issues.

Researchers think they may have found a substance that helps prevent some of these aging issues. After infusing laboratory mice with a substance found in broccoli, cucumbers, edamame, cabbage, and avocados, they noticed a difference on a cellular level. While the mice continued to age over time, their cells still behaved as if they were younger, when compared to mice that weren’t given the ingredient found in green vegetables.

The common denominator in these foods is a substance called nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN). The mice who received a regular infusion of this substance showed improvements in metabolism, blood sugar levels, and eyesight. Healthier cells that behave like younger cells may also have the ability to fight off diseases such as cancer and Alzheimer’s and, in the end, help people to live longer.

The benefits from NMN are not just for seniors though. All generations can boost cell health and stop part of the aging process by finding creative ways to eat more green vegetables. For those who don’t enjoy them or can’t eat them raw, including them in soups and smoothies is a great way to get more broccoli, avocado, cabbage, and edamame into the diet.

Obtaining senior care assistance from a home health aide from a homecare provider like David York Agency can be a great first step toward improving the nutrition of your elderly loved one. Whether you simply need someone to help with grocery shopping and preparing healthy meals, or you need a full-time home healthcare aide, DYA can provide the personalized care your family needs.

For more information about our qualified, compassionate caregivers, contact us at 718.376.7755. A free phone consultation can help you decide what services might be best to provide you and your loved one with the assistance you need.

If you’d like to hear more from us, please like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter, Google+, or LinkedIn.

7 Benefits of Providing Extra Care for Seniors with CHF

caring for seniors with CHF

Congestive Heart Failure (CHF) affects almost 5 million Americans. CHF means the heart is unable to pump effectively to deliver blood, oxygen, and nutrients to the body.

You may be wondering how non-medical care can help a patient with CHF. There are many benefits, but these seven top the list.

1. Early Recognition of Warning Signs

The initial symptoms of CHF often go unnoticed, especially if the primary caregiver doesn’t know what to look for. If you notice any of these symptoms, it is important to call the doctor immediately.

  • Sudden weight gain (3 pounds or more in 1 or 2 days)
  • Increased swelling in legs or ankles
  • Shortness of breath while at rest
  • Dizziness or fainting
  • Dry, hacking cough or wheezing
  • Increased fatigue or feeling unwell all the time
  • Abdominal pain or swelling

2. Assistance Maintaining a Healthy Diet

A healthy diet can help offset the health issues related to CHF. Caregivers can ensure a patient maintains a healthy and complete diet by implementing these tips:

  • Decrease sodium intake, and read food labels for items with less than 350 mg sodium per serving.
  • Cook with less salt.
  • Increase intake of fresh fruits and vegetables.
  • Cook with fresh meat, legumes, and eggs, and avoid highly processed foods.
  • Season with herbs, spices, flavored vinegar, and fruit juices.

3. Keeping the Patient Physically Active

Physical activity is another important way to combat CHF. Caregivers should follow these tips to help patients stay physically active, despite their condition:

  • Encourage low to moderate exercise.
  • Perform activities in short intervals, especially if your patient is easily fatigued.
  • Take short walks to get the blood moving.
  • Take the stairs instead of the elevator.
  • Park at the edges of the parking lot when going to the store.
  • Perform light housework together.

4. Ensuring the Patient is Comfortable

CHF can bring with it some fairly uncomfortable side effects. A caregiver can ensure that the patient stays as comfortable as possible by:

  • Helping them find and wear comfortable clothes and shoes
  • Helping them select and wear support stockings
  • Providing pillows to elevate head, making it easier to breathe

5. Administration of Medications and Supplements

There are many medications and supplements that can help relieve the symptoms of CHF — but only if they’re taken regularly. A caregiver can help ensure they’re being taken at the appropriate time by:

  • Reminding the patient to take their medication on time
  • Establishing a schedule
  • Helping them organize a weekly pillbox
  • Keeping a record of medication intake and any side effects

6. Make the Most of Doctor Visits

Doctor visits are an important time to communicate changes in a patient’s condition and address possible issues. Caregivers can help in these ways:

  • Keeping records and going over them at the doctor appointment
  • Scheduling appointments
  • Providing transportation to and from doctor visits
  • Asking questions and taking notes

7. Daily Record Keeping

The symptoms of CHF can change from day to day, and it’s important to keep careful records to track how the patient’s health looks over the long-term. Consider all of these things:

  • How is the patient breathing?
  • What dedications (names, doses, times, any side effects) are they currently taking?
  • How is their diet and level of activity?
  • Are there any notable or unusual symptoms?

 

If your senior loved one suffers from CHF or other severe heart problems, they may benefit from the added care and expertise of an in-home healthcare provider. There are many advantages of having a knowledgeable caregiver who can ensure a patient’s health and safety, as well as their medical requirements, are kept in mind at all times.

At David York Agency, we offer home healthcare services from highly trained and vetted professionals you can trust. From home health aides to RN’s and LPNs, DYA can provide your family with a level of in-home healthcare that meets your needs.

For more information about our qualified, compassionate caregivers, contact us at 718.376.7755. A free phone consultation can help you decide what services might be best to provide you and your loved one with the assistance you need.

If you’d like to hear more from us, please like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter, Google+, or LinkedIn.

 

5 Ways to Prevent Falls in the Elderly

preventing falls in the elderly

There are few things scarier for the elderly than a fall. A fall can result in an array of problems and pain — or worse. So what can you do to prevent falls in an elderly home? Here are some tips that can help.

1. Prepare the Home

Elderproofing your home is critically important. There is nothing that can substitute for making sure the elderly person in the home is not in danger of slipping, falling, or otherwise hurting his or herself. If you need a consultation to help you assess your home, David York Agency has full elderproofing services by a certified specialist. Here is a handy tip sheet.

2. Regular Exercise

Exercise can help an elderly person maintain balance and strength. This has a two-fold benefit in that good balance control will prevent falls while increased strength can help prevent or lessen injuries.

3. Physical Therapy

Physical therapy may be prescribed by the elderly person’s doctor. This can further increase balance and strength. Talk to their doctor about getting a referral.

4. Standing and Sitting

Standing and sitting are things we don’t think much about, but the elderly can have a very hard time with these everyday tasks. Help them remember to do so slowly and consciously to avoid dizziness and balance issues that can result in a fall.

5. Limit Alcohol

Even if the doctor allows it in moderation, alcohol increases dizziness and should be limited in the case of an elderly person at risk of falling.

If you have an elderly loved one living at home, it is important to take steps to reduce the risk of falls. Implementing the above safety tips will help keep your loved one from being injured. For additional information on preventing senior falls, look at our handout and our resource page, or contact us to learn more about elder care.

At David York Agency, we understand the fears and challenges that being at high risk for falls can bring, not just for the person diagnosed, but for everyone in their life. We provide families with the support and care they need during this particularly difficult time.

For more information about David York Agency’s qualified, compassionate caregivers, contact us at 718.376.7755. A free consultation can help you decide what services might be best to provide you and your loved one with the assistance they need.

If you’d like to hear more from us, please like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter, Google+, or LinkedIn.

Common Sense Medication Reminders For Senior Care

medication reminders for seniors

Most nurses can attest to the frustration felt when going through a medication reconciliation with an elderly patient. Oftentimes the elderly patient will come to the ER with a pill box and no idea of what medications it contains. They may be able to recognize certain pills based on color and size and how they correlate to how many times daily they take the pills, but without any idea of what the medication is for. As a result, the hospital staff is often left waiting for family members to arrive with a medication list that is, in many cases, outdated.

So what common sense interventions can ensure accurate medication administration in senior care when reminders such as pill boxes and medication lists aren’t enough? Here are three tips for helping your senior loved one stay on top of their daily prescriptions.

1. Be Actively Involved

Whether it’s a family member or a home health aide, it’s important to have someone around regularly to ensure your elderly loved is taking their medications as prescribed.

Upon daily examination of the pill boxes, have you noticed that some pills have been missed? Do you occasionally find a spare pill under a chair or the bed? Has your senior been sick lately, dealing with bouts of nausea or vomiting that cause them to miss taking pills due to skipping meals?

Having a personal presence in the life of your elderly loved one can make a huge difference in their safety and in decreasing hospital admissions.

2. Education Is Key

Although it can be tedious, allowing the elderly person to go through the pill box filling process themselves can be very enlightening. You can determine if they understand the schedule and if they are aware of what pills they are taking and for what reasons.

For example, if they are aware that four of their daily pills are for blood pressure, and upon waking they check their blood pressure and get a low reading, this awareness may encourage them to confer with a home health nurse or their doctor’s office before taking the prescribed medications—which could dangerously lower their blood pressure.

3. Simplify the Prescription Filling Routine

Try to have medications filled at only one pharmacy if possible, and then assign one person to be in charge of reconciling what medications are filled on a monthly basis with the medication list. This way, medications that are no longer being prescribed can be eliminated from the list, while newly prescribed medications can be added on a month-to-month basis.

Keeping track of a sometimes long list of medications can be difficult for many seniors, especially when other factors—such as memory loss or illness—come into play. While it may not always be possible for you to be there to remind them what to take and when, a home health aide can provide the extra care and support your loved one needs.

At David York Agency, our experienced in-home healthcare providers can help to monitor medication and ensure your senior takes the medications they need, when they need them. We are certified and trained in the latest guidelines for eldercare.

For more information about David York Agency’s qualified, compassionate caregivers, contact us at 718.376.7755. A free phone consultation can help you decide what services might be best to provide you and your loved one with the assistance you need.

If you’d like to hear more from us, please like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter, Google+, or LinkedIn.

How to Manage Stress When Providing Ongoing Care for a Loved One

how to manage stress

Becoming a caretaker is almost always a rewarding experience. Being able to care for a loved one who needs you is an enriching and satisfying feeling. However, taking on the role of permanent or even part-time caregiver for a family member or friend can quickly bring on feelings of immense stress, helplessness, anger, and fatigue.

It’s crucial to take the time to care for yourself when you have taken on the caregiving role. There are stress relief exercises for caregivers that, if followed, can help reduce the stress that is more than likely to occur when you feel overwhelmed and underappreciated.

Support Groups

A great way to get some stress relief in your life is to talk with other caregivers who can relate to your struggles. Online support groups offer caregivers a place to vent, cry, ask for advice, and just read about what others are going through. You may also want to talk to your loved one’s doctor to find out if there are actual support group meetings in your area that you could attend. Many churches offer support groups for caregivers, as there are generally many elderly folks in their congregations.

Pamper Yourself

Remember, being a caregiver isn’t just about the person who needs help. You need to take care of yourself so that you don’t feel like it’s all about everyone else. Take the time that you need to pamper yourself in whatever way you desire. Get a manicure, take a hot bubble bath, schedule a massage, lay out in the sun with a good book, or whatever makes you happy and relaxed. Don’t feel guilty for including “me time” in your schedule.

Ask for Help

It’s easy to want to take on the role of full-time caregiver, especially when it is a very close relative, such as your mother or father. But it is almost impossible to do everything for someone else and still take care of yourself. Asking for help from others will reduce a great deal of stress, especially when you see that you don’t have to do it all alone. Accept help from those who offer, and don’t be afraid to ask. You can’t do it all by yourself and expect not to get stressed.

Open Your World

Consulteering (see previous DYA post), taking on small consulting gigs or volunteer assignments, give you an opportunity to remain in touch with the outside world and contribute to society. It is a great, productive distraction that also keeps you fresh with stories to bring home to the person you are caring for.

Caregiver stress is a normal occurrence—even for professionals. When you’re feeling stressed, the key is to remember that you are not alone and that there are healthy ways to cope with your feelings.

If you are feeling overwhelmed by the responsibility of caring for a loved one, remember that help is available. At David York Agency, we provide full and part-time support for caregivers and their families to lessen the burden of ensuring their loved one is safe, happy, and healthy.

For more information about David York Agency’s qualified, compassionate caregivers, contact us at 718.376.7755. A free consultation can help you decide what services might be best to provide you and your loved one with the assistance you need.

If you’d like to hear more from us, please like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter, Google+, or LinkedIn.