Steps to Healthier Eating Habits

Between concerns over diseases endemic to the elderly like diabetes or heart disease, catering to individual food sensitivities, and managing interactions with medication, a proper diet is essential to good health for the elderly. According to the National Institutes of Health, eating a well-planned, balanced mix of foods everyday may very well reduce the risk of heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes, bone loss, some kinds of cancer, and anemia. Also, for those who may already have one or more of these chronic diseases, eating well and being physically active may help better manage these conditions.

Beyond considerations of preventing or managing illness, eating well plays other important roles in the daily lives of the elderly, from maintaining a healthy level of energy to properly regulating weight.

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Energy level

With obesity rates in the U.S. skyrocketing, we hear a lot about eating too much; but eating too little, or not eating appropriate foods can also be a problem. Consuming enough calories gives the body the fuel it needs to not only perform physical tasks like walking, but mental tasks as well which means one needs to be properly fueled throughout the day for optimal cognitive function and memory. There are several factors that account for the number of calories needed: age, gender, height, weight, and level of activity.

Weight & Activity Level

Proper weight is a concern for most people throughout their lives, but it becomes especially important as the body ages and becomes more at risk for diseases like type 2 diabetes and heart disease, while excess pounds can wreak havoc on aging joints. Consuming not only the right amount of calories, but also the right kind of calories — a healthy blend of foods: fruits, grains, meat, veggies — help to control weight.

Eating more calories than your body needs for your activity level will lead to extra pounds. Many people become less active as they age, which equates to needing fewer calories to maintain a healthy weight. The NIH recommends choosing mostly nutrient-dense foods—those which have a lot of nutrients but relatively few calories—which can supply needed nutrients while keeping down calorie intake.

Taking small steps to improve eating habits is often the most effective way to make lasting changes. By starting with incremental changes—adding a new vegetable to the menu, or simply taking the salt shaker off the table—healthy habits become second nature, and easy to adhere to. Eating well is not about following a diet or losing those extra pounds; rather, it’s a way of living that can improve life exponentially.

David York Agency provides skilled home health aide services for the elderly in their home and is abreast of all the latest guidelines for seniors.  They offer the services of Certified Home Health Aides (HHA), Certified Personal Health Care Aides (PCA), Registered Nurses (RN), Licensed Practical Nurses (LPN), full- or part-time, live-in or -out, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Licensed by the New York State Department of Health, they believe your loved one deserves the best care. Call for a free consultation today at 718-376-7755. Please visit the website, like them on Facebook, or follow the agency on TwitterGoogle+ or LinkedIn.

 

 

Returning Home After a Stroke

When a stroke occurs, time spent in the hospital amounts to mere moments compared to what can be a lengthy and challenging recovery process. A stroke can change your loved one’s life in the blink of an eye, and can suddenly make normal, everyday activities impossible for the stroke survivor to do alone. Living arrangements, too, can create unique issues—even the scope of the home (its layout and its associated responsibilities) may be incompatible with their changed capabilities.

As soon as possible in advance of the stroke survivor being discharged, an assessment should be made of the stroke survivor’s entire situation, including their living environment, support fromUntitled1 family, disability and insurance benefits, along with the possible introduction of in-home healthcare.

According to information published by the US Agency for HealthCare Research and Quality, ensure a safe and comfortable transition by reviewing the following and making necessary changes:

  • Making sure that your loved one has a safe place to live,
  • Deciding what care, assistance, or special equipment will be needed,
  • Arranging for more rehabilitation services or for other services in the home (such as visits by a physical therapist or hiring a home health aide),
  • Choosing a healthcare professional or doctor who will monitor your loved one’s health and medical needs,
  •  Learning the necessary skills to provide your loved one with daily care and assistance at home,

Experts recommend that, when possible, families take the initial steps in deciding on in-home healthcare well in advance. David York Agency provides qualified and well-trained healthcare professionals when you need them: Certified Home Health Aides (HHA), Certified Personal Health Care Aides (PCA), Registered Nurses (RN), Licensed Practical Nurses (LPN), full or part-time, live-in or -out, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Licensed by the New York State Department of Health, we believe your loved one deserves the best care. Call for a free consultation today, at 718-376-7755.